Christ the King; today, not in November and of the world, not “in our hearts”

It’s Christ our King, not Christ our pal.

It is a feast primarily about celebrating Christ’s ongoing kingship over all reality, including this present world, where the Church must fight for the recognition of His rights, the actual extension of His dominion to all domains, individual and social.”

“Including this present world”…

I was going to write a Thing about why we have the Feast of Christ the King on the last Sunday in October, and why the change of the date by the Bugnini Cabal was a way of undermining its meaning. In fact, the change of the date of Christ the King is a little nutshell version of how they changed Catholicism’s whole purpose. It became about the private, interior (and Protestant-derived) “personal relationship with Jesus” instead of a cosmological religion describing objective reality to which all people are obliged to adhere.

It seems, however, that I am not the only person who thought this was a good idea. Which is good, because for various reasons I feel like crap today and don’t want to do the extra work.

Fortunately, Peter has already done it.

Good work, Spock.

To paraphrase: the Catholic Church – in the person of Pope Pius XI who promulgated the feast in 1925 – put it on the days before the Feasts of All Souls and All Saints, and in the last space of time before the end of the liturgical year, to symbolise the requirement that all nations on earth recognise Jesus Christ as King. No, not just “King in our hearts,” and not just king of the world after the Second Coming, but recognising his rightful sovereignty over all nations in this life, right here and right now. Nations, that is, governments, are obliged – yes obliged – to obey Christ in their laws and directives.

The change of date symbolised the Church backing away (in alarm) from this radical idea. Putting it on the last Sunday of the liturgical year meant that we no longer thought it was a requirement that all nations – before the end of time and the Parousia – recognise the prerogatives of Christ as ruler in this life.

Here’s Peter with way more and way better explanations:

“One of the most egregious differences between the two calendars (in the Latin Rite) is the location of the Feast of the Kingship of Our Lord Jesus Christ. In the old calendar, it is always celebrated on the last Sunday of the month of October, right before All Saints. In the new calendar, however, it is the last Sunday of the liturgical year, leading up to the First Sunday of Advent…”

“Pius XI’s intention…is to emphasise the glory of Christ as terminus of His earthly mission, a glory and mission visible and perpetuated in history by the saints. Hence the feast falls shortly before the Feast of All Saints, to emphasize that what Christ inaugurated in His own person before ascending in glory, the saints then instantiate and carry further in human society, culture, and nations. It is a feast primarily about celebrating Christ’s ongoing kingship over all reality, including this present world, where the Church must fight for the recognition of His rights, the actual extension of His dominion to all domains, individual and social.

“Indeed, there’s also the obvious fact, unmentioned in Quas Primas but surely in everyone’s mind, that the last Sunday in October had, for centuries, been celebrated as Reformation Sunday. A Catholic counter-feast, reminding the world not only of the comprehensive Kingship of Jesus Christ—so often denied socially and culturally by various teachings of Protestantism—but also of the worldwide kingly authority of His Church, would certainly be a reasonable application of the principle lex orandi, lex credendi.”

“In the liturgical reforms following the Second Vatican Council, its place was changed to the last Sunday of the Church year—that is, so that one week later would fall the first Sunday of Advent. This new position emphasizes rather the eschatological dimension of Christ’s kingship…”

“Though both placements are defensible, it would seem that Pius XI’s intention, consistent with the encyclical as a whole, was more to insist on the rights of Jesus Christ here and now, and the corresponding duties of men and nations on earth…”

“From this vantage, which certainly does not sound like the language of Dignitatis Humanae or the postconciliar diplomacy of the Church, it is hard to resist thinking that the eschatological perspective betrays weak knees before the challenge of modern secularization, as well as hesitation about the perceived “triumphalism” of the earlier papal social teaching. In other words, the kingship of Christ is palatable and proclaimable so long as its realization comes at the end of time, and does not impinge too much on the political and social order right now—or on the Church’s responsibility to convert the nations, invigorate their cultures, and transform their laws by the light of the Faith.”

Those vital and urgent truths for which Pius XI instituted the very feast of the Kingship of Christ—are they still alive, are they still being preached and taught, are they the lifeblood of the Church’s every liturgy, apostolate, pastoral program? Are we are looking at a feast whose time has passed? The places where the original feast is still celebrated on its original day have, in my experience, some awareness of what this is all about, and nurture a desire to live according to these truths. May the Novemberites sooner or later rediscover the full depth and breadth of this feast as its institutor conceived it.

~

Okay? Got it? Christ the King of the nations of the world, right now, in this life and in ALL nations, the publicly acknowledged sovereign, not “Christ the King of our hearts” or some other sloppy sentimental – and meaningless, completely ignorable – nonsense.

Here’s the original document about it from the pope, Quas Primas, from the Way Olden Days of last week, when we had popes who believed Catholicism was true.

Here’s an Act of Consecration of the Human Race to Christ the King

Most sweet Jesus, Redeemer of the human race,
look down upon us humbly prostrate before Thy altar.
We are Thine, and Thine we wish to be;
but to be more surely united with Thee,
behold each one of us freely consecrates himself today to Thy most Sacred Heart.
Many indeed have never known Thee;
many too, despising Thy precepts, have rejected Thee.
Have mercy on them all, most merciful Jesus,
and draw them to Thy Sacred Heart.
Be Thou King, O Lord, not only of the faithful who have never forsaken Thee,
but also of the prodigal children who have abandoned Thee;
grant that they may quickly return to their Father’s house lest they die of wretchedness and hunger.
Be Thou King of those who are deceived by erroneous opinions,
or whom discord keeps aloof, and call them back to the harbour of truth and unity of faith,
so that soon there may be but one flock and one Shepherd.
Be Thou King of all those who are still involved in the darkness of idolatry or of Islam,
and refuse not to to draw them all into the light and kingdom of God.
Turn Thine eyes of mercy towards the children of that race, once Thy chosen people:
of old they called down upon themselves the Blood of the Saviour;
may It now descend upon them, a laver of redemption and of life.
Grant, O Lord, to Thy Church assurance of freedom and immunity from harm;
give peace and order to all nations, and make the earth resound from pole to pole with one cry:
“Praise be to the Divine Heart that wrought our salvation; to It be glory and honour for ever.”
Amen.

Source: http://whatisupwiththesynod.com/index.php/2017/10/29/christ-the-king-today-not-in-november/

The War Against Cardinal Sarah | Marco Tosatti | First Things

by Marco Tosatti 10 . 23 . 17

Now that Cardinal Gerhard Müller has been removed from his post at the Vatican, the main target of the circle around Pope Francis is Cardinal Robert Sarah, prefect of the Congregation for Divine Worship. Their latest coup is the release of a letter of “correction” aimed at Cardinal Sarah and signed by Francis. Published on Sunday, the letter was celebrated as a just humiliation of the cardinal and accompanied by calls for his resignation.

Earlier . . .

Source: The War Against Cardinal Sarah | Marco Tosatti | First Things

Whispers in the Loggia: In Magnum’s Wake, Pope “Clarifies” Sarah. Again.

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2017

In an extraordinary rebuke to one of his own Curial cardinals, the Pope has aimed to “explain simply, and hopefully clearly… some errors” in his Worship chief’s understanding of Magnum Principium, his recent motu proprio on liturgical translations, indicating the new norms granting new oversight to bishops’ conferences as a fresh development and declaring several key pieces of the operative rules in 2001’s Liturgiam authenticam “abrogated.”

A year since Francis’ last open clash with his top liturgical aide, a personal letter from the pontiff to the CDW prefect Cardinal Robert Sarah (above, ad orientem), dated 15 October, was published this morning by the Italian outlet La Nuova Bussola Quotidiana and subsequently confirmed by the Holy See Press Office, as well as being placed on the Italian homepage of Vatican Radio. (Ironically enough, even as this Ordinary Sunday takes precedence, today marks the feast of St John Paul II, under whose authority LA was promulgated.)

Noting a recent, lengthy commentary in which Sarah stated that LAremains “the authoritative text concerning liturgical translations,” the Pope responded by relating that paragraphs 79-84 of the 2001 norms – those which deal precisely with the requirement for a vernacular rendering’s recognitio by Rome – were now abolished, going on to note that Magnum “no longer upholds that translations must conform on all points with the norms of Liturgiam authenticam, as was the case in the past.”

In the new balance of responsibility, Francis said, Sarah’s contention that “the words recognitio and confirmatio, without being strictly synonymous [to explain the Vatican’s role], are nevertheless interchangeable” – in essence, that little had changed from LA – was not the case. As the pontiff explained, “the faculty” now belongs to the respective bishops’ conferences “to judge the goodness and coherence of terms in the translation of the original, albeit in dialogue with the Holy See”; in other words, not a unilateral call on Rome’s part, even at the process’ final stage.

Given considerable focus in the new norms’ wake on the use of the word “fideliter” – that is, a conference’s charge of weighing a translation’s fidelity to the original – in Magnum‘s revision of the Code of Canon Law, the pontiff writes that the term, as judged by an episcopal conference, implies a “triple” meaning: “first, to the original text; to the particular language in which it is translated, and finally to the understanding of the text by its audience.

In light of LA‘s revision of translation principles – which placed a premium on accuracy to the original Latin text over a “dynamic equivalence” approach that allowed a looser standard to ensure widespread comprehension – the Pope’s new interpretation is of particular significance.

While Francis began his letter by thanking the Guinean cardinal for his “contribution,” it bears recalling that, on Magnum‘s release in early September, Sarah – who Papa Bergoglio himself named to CDW in late 2014 – was conspicuous by his absence: an explanatory note on the new norms was instead issued by his deputy, the English Archbishop Arthur Roche. A former bishop of Leeds and chairman of ICEL – the global coordinating body for English-language translations – Roche was likewise received by Francis in a private audience earlier this month by himself.

Given the broad circulation of Sarah’s earlier interpretation on the new norms – in particular, among circles routinely critical, or even hostile, toward the pontiff – Francis closed the letter by asking the cardinal to transmit his response to the outlets which previously ran Sarah’s piece, as well as to the episcopal conferences and CDW’s staff and membership.

The letter published today marks the third instance of Sarah’s responses to Francis meeting a very public retort from the Pope. In early 2016, as CDW promulgated the decree formally allowing women to participate in the washing of the feet on Holy Thursday, an attached letter from the pontiff to the cardinal revealed that Papa Bergoglio’s directive for the change had been held up for over a year.

Six months later, Francis (through the Press Office) issued a “clarification” that Sarah had been “incorrectly interpreted” in calling for priests to adopt the ad orientem stance in celebrating Mass, which the cardinal urged days earlier at a conference for traditionalists in London.

In a major speech to Italian liturgists late last summer, Francis declared, “with certainty and magisterial authority,” that the Vatican II reforms are “irreversible” – adding that, for the church, “the liturgy is life, and not an idea to be understood.”
POSTED BY ROCCO PALMO AT 08:01

Source: Whispers in the Loggia: In Magnum’s Wake, Pope “Clarifies” Sarah. Again.

The Rosary After 800 Years: Why Our Lady’s Apparition to St. Dominic Still Matters

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Written by Michael Matt | Editor, The Remnant

“Moreover, we may well believe that the Queen of Heaven herself has granted an especial efficacy to this mode of supplication, for it was by her command and counsel that the devotion was begun and spread abroad by the holy Patriarch Dominic.”

– Pope Leo XIII, (Octobri Mense Encyclical on the Rosary, 1891) –

Editor’s Note by Michael J. Matt: The following was published in The Remnant back in 1995, before the promulgation of Pope John Paul’s (when he was very elderly and ill) Luminous Mysteries. It is very fashionable these days to argue that Our Lady never actually appeared to St. Dominic in order to commission him with the task of spreading devotion to the most Holy Rosary. This entire incident, supported by at least 15 popes and numerous saints, is nevertheless chalked up as yet another one of the “pious legends of old Christendom” of which our Modernist friends are so fond.

But this “legend” is so well substantiated by popes and saints in history that its authenticity cannot be reasonably questioned without revealing at least a Modernist leaning.

When Our Lady appeared to St. Dominic at Prouilhe in southern France in the 13th century, she was accompanied by three angels, and she asked him: “Dear Dominic, do you know which weapon the Blessed Trinity wants to use to reform the world? I want you to know that, in this kind of warfare, the battering ram has always been the Angelic Psalter which is the foundation stone of the New Testament. Therefore, if you want to reach these hardened souls and win them over to God, preach my Psalter composed of 150 Angelic Salutations and 15 Our Fathers and you will obtain an abundant harvest.”

At this, St. Dominic went out and preached the Rosary, first to the Albigensian heretics and then to all of Europe, in compliance with the instruction he’d received from Our Lady—with fifteen mysteries grouped into five decades each.

Lest there be any doubt of this, here is a photograph of the Basilica of Our lady of the Rosary and the Dominican Monastery of Prouilhe:
20160613 120116
This is one of the most venerated pilgrimage destinations in France, and it is where St. Dominic established the headquarters of his Order of Preachers—the very spot where according to 800-year-old tradition Our Lady appeared to St. Dominic and gave him the devotion of the Holy Rosary.

The history of this event is strongly supported by the tradition of the Dominican Order itself, but also Pope Leo XIII—the “Pope of the Rosary”, who wrote 12 encyclicals and 5 apostolic letters on the Rosary—who affirmed over and over again the Dominican origin of the Rosary and in a letter to the Bishop of Carcassonne (1889), admits that he accepts the tradition of Prouille as the place where the Blessed Virgin Mary appeared to St. Dominic, revealing this devotion—a tradition supported by at least 15 popes, including the great St. Pius V who codified the Rosary as it had been given to St. Dominic by Our Lady along with the Tridentine Mass after the Council of Trent. It should come as little surprise, then, that Modernists have been trying to crush both the Tridentine Mass and Rosary, ever since.

Here, then, is a more thorough history of the Rosary itself as well as its documented and demonstrated power against evil in the world, both in the past as well as more modern times. MJM

THE HOLY ROSARY:
Ultimate Liturgy

There is no mention whatever of the Rosary in the documents of the Second Vatican Council. Not even in the Dogmatic Constitution Lumen Gentium, whose final chapter deals exclusively with our Lady ’s role in the Church. A vague reference in Article 67 to “practices and exercises of devotion towards her” might be assumed to include it, but according to Bishop Rendeiro of Coïmbra, the Bishops who wished to add to the text “the Rosary with meditation on the Mysteries of the life of Christ and the Blessed Virgin” were voted down. Apparently the Council deemed it best to follow the recommendations of the Theological Commission and make no mention of particular devotions, for fear of encouraging manifestations of piety beyond what they termed “the limits of sound and orthodox doctrine.” [1]

Read more here: http://remnantnewspaper.com/web/index.php/articles/item/3467-the-rosary-after-800-years-why-our-lady-s-appiration-to-st-dominic-still-matters

Bishop Athanasius Schneider – Oct. 26

The Charlotte Latin Mass Community (CLMC) and St. Ann parish have the distinct privilege of welcoming His Excellency, Bishop Athanasius Schneider, O.R.C., the Auxiliary Bishop of Astana, Kazakhstan to St. Ann parish on Thursday October 26 at 7pm.  The event is the 2nd Annual Commemoration to Blessed Karl of Austria.

H.E. Bishop Athanasius Schneider, ORC

Solemn Pontifical Mass & Reception

Bishop Schneider will offer a special Solemn Pontifical Mass and during his sermon discuss the doctrine of the Kingship of Christ.  This Mass will be the first Pontifical Latin Mass in the Diocese of Charlotte in over 30 years.

Immediately after Mass, a light reception will be held in the St. Ann Allen Center where Bishop Schneider will offer some brief remarks about the Kingship of Christ and Blessed Karl.

Solemn Pontifical Mass
His Excellency Bishop Athanasius Schneider, ORC
7:00pm, Thursday October 26
St. Ann Catholic Church
3635 Park Road
Charlotte, NC

Reception & brief remarks to follow in the St. Ann Msgr. Allen Center

 

Bishop Athanasius Schneider

Bishop Athanasius Schneider is one of foremost defenders of the Catholic faith in the Church today and a defender of the Holy Eucharist (he promotes reception on the tongue and kneeling).  Bishop Schneider is of German descent, but grew up in the Soviet Union and later moved to West Germany.

His experience under Soviet rule makes him uniquely qualified to discuss the Kingship of Christ – the purpose of the visit.   Lastly, of course, the Bishop is also a friend of the Traditional Latin Mass which he offers regularly.   To learn more about him you can visit this website:

https://liturgyguy.com/tag/bishop-athanasius-schneider/page/5/

 

What is a Pontifical Mass?

A Pontifical Mass is a Traditional Latin Mass offered by a Bishop or a Cardinal, and is one of the highest ranking Masses in the Church.  It contains its own rubrics and traditions.  You can learn more about it here:

http://modernmedievalism.blogspot.com/2017/08/pontificalia-i-what-is-pontifical-mass.html

http://acatholiclife.blogspot.com/2009/09/dress-code-for-pontifical-high-mass.html

 

Who is Blessed Karl?

Blessed Karl Habsburg I of Austria was the last Holy Roman Emperor, and the last Catholic King of Europe who reigned over the Austro-Hungarian Empire from 1916-1919. He had a deep love for the Eucharist and the Blessed Mother. Blessed Karl married Zita of Bourbon-Parma and they had eight children, the last one born two months after his death.

He inherited World War I from his predecessor, and strove unsuccessfully to make peace between the two sides to end the war and bloodshed.  He was known for his virtue and sanctity. After the war, the allied powers exiled him to the Portuguese Island of Madeira where he died in poverty in 1922.

 

In 1972 his tomb was opened and his body was found to be incorrupt.  He was beatified by St. John Paul II on October 3, 2004.  His feast day is October 21 – not the date of his death but the anniversary of his marriage.

Blessed Karl’s devotion to his wife Zita, and his virtuous leadership as King makes him a patron saint for marriage, and for leaders of governments.  His virtue as King made him an ideal example of a Christian leader called for by the doctrine of the Kingship of Christ.

To learn more about Blessed Karl, please visit his canonization cause website: http://www.emperorcharles.org/

We recommend reading about Blessed Karl’s life and the connection his reign had with Our Lady of Fatima’s message:

http://www.emperorcharles.org/news/2016/10/5/blessed-karl-of-austria-and-the-surprising-fatima-connection

 

The visit

This will be a historic visit and event for the CLMC, St. Ann parish, and the diocese. For more information please contact us.

Have we been left to the viciousness of the wolves?

P.S. Is Bergoglio working to make it possible to pick his own successor? Also, it seems to me that you can tell alot about a man by those whom he holds close and promotes as opposed to those whom he shuns and demotes.

From the Remnant: http://remnantnewspaper.com/web/index.php/articles/item/3440-resisting-francis-pope-corrected-for-spreading-heresy

Comfort Catholicism Has to Go; It is Time to Prepare for Persecution |Blogs | NCRegister.com

We are at war for our own souls and the souls of people we love. We are at war for the soul of this culture and nation. And like any soldier, we must train to fight well.

BY MSGR. CHARLES POPE 08/21/2016

There is a growing consternation among some Catholics that the Church, at least in her leadership, is living in the past. It seems there is no awareness that we are at war and that Catholics need to be summoned to sobriety, increasing separation from the wider culture, courageous witness and increasing martyrdom.

It is long past dark in our culture, but in most parishes and dioceses it is business as usual and there is anything but the sober alarm that is really necessary in times like these.

Scripture says, Blessed be the Lord, my rock, who trains my hands for war, and my fingers for battle (Psalm 144:1). Preparing people for war — a moral and spiritual war, not a shooting war — should include a clear setting forth of the errors of our time, and a clear and loving application of the truth to error and light to darkness.

But there is little such training evident in Catholic circles today where, in the average parish, there exists a sort of shy and quiet atmosphere — a fear of addressing “controversial” issues lest someone be offended, or the parish be perceived as “unwelcoming.”

But, if there ever was a time to wear soft garments, it is not now.

The Church of the 1970s-1990s was surely well described as the era of “beige Catholicism” (a term coined by Bishop Robert Barron, and not by way of flattery either). Those of us who lived through that era, especially in the 1970s, remember it as a time when many parish signs beckoned people to “come and experience our welcoming and warm Catholic community.” Our most evident desire was to fit in and be thought of as “normal.” Yes, Catholics were just like everyone else; and we had been working very hard to do that, at least since the early 1960s when John F. Kennedy was elected. Catholics had finally “made it” into the mainstream; we had been accepted by the culture.

Church architecture and interiors became minimalist and non-descript. Music and language in the liturgy became folksy. Marian processions, Corpus Christi processions, many things of distinctive and colorful Catholicism all but disappeared. Even our crucifixes disappeared, to be replaced by floating “resurrection Jesus” images. The emphasis was on blending in, speaking to things that made people feel comfortable, and affirming rather than challenging. If there was to be any challenge at all it would be on “safe” exhortations such as not abusing the environment or polluting, not judging or being intolerant, and so forth.

Again, if there ever was a time to wear soft garments, it is not now. It is zero-dark-thirty in our post-Christian culture. And while we may wish to blame any number of factors for the collapse, we cannot exclude ourselves. We who are supposed to be the light of the world, with Christ shining in us, have preferred to hide our light under a basket and lay low. The ruins of our families and culture are testimony to the triumph of error and the suppression of the truth.

 Read more here: Comfort Catholicism Has to Go; It is Time to Prepare for Persecution |Blogs | NCRegister.com

Si vis pacem, para bellum. If you want peace, ready war

Posted on 24 August 2016 by Fr. John Zuhlsdorf

Sometimes Leon Trotsky is given credit for saying that you might not be interested in war but war is interested in you.  He didn’t say that, exactly, but it is nevertheless true.

I have not infrequently challenged you readers to be ready and to get readier for sudden reversals of fortune and for what I think are inevitable long-term struggles, both on the general, human level and on the level of our being members of the Catholic Church.

At the same time I as I been pushing the old semper paratus line, the old “Si vis pacem, para bellum” line, some folks out there in the wider interwebs have been snuffling and sniveling and wringing their hands over bellicose imagery, hard stands, adherence to standards and – forehand – doctrine and law.  They moan that the time for being culture “warriors” is over, nay rather, that such militant attitudes are counter-productive and, well, just not very nice.

To these I say: “Nuts!”

My friend, the awake and watchful Msgr. Charles Pope has written something which must be read.  HERE

Please take note of this sample and then read the rest there:

Comfort Catholicism Has to Go; It is Time to Prepare for Persecution

We are at war for our own souls and the souls of people we love. We are at war for the soul of this culture and nation. And like any soldier, we must train to fight well.

There is a growing consternation among some Catholics that the Church, at least in her leadership, is living in the past. It seems there is no awareness that we are at war and that Catholics need to be summoned to sobriety, increasing separation from the wider culture, courageous witness and increasing martyrdom.

It is long past dark in our culture, but in most parishes and dioceses it is business as usual and there is anything but the sober alarm that is really necessary in times like these.

Scripture says, Blessed be the Lord, my rock, who trains my hands for war, and my fingers for battle (Psalm 144:1). Preparing people for war — a moral and spiritual war, not a shooting war — should include a clear setting forth of the errors of our time, and a clear and loving application of the truth to error and light to darkness.

But there is little such training evident in Catholic circles today where, in the average parish, there exists a sort of shy and quiet atmosphere — a fear of addressing “controversial” issues lest someone be offended, or the parish be perceived as “unwelcoming.”

But, if there ever was a time to wear soft garments, it is not now.

[…]

Again, if there ever was a time to wear soft garments, it is not now. It is zero-dark-thirty in our post-Christian culture. And while we may wish to blame any number of factors for the collapse, we cannot exclude ourselves. We who are supposed to be the light of the world, with Christ shining in us, have preferred to hide our light under a basket and lay low. The ruins of our families and culture are testimony to the triumph of error and the suppression of the truth.

Read more here: Fr. Z’s Blog | Formerly entitled: “What Does The Prayer Really Say?” – Clear, straight commentary on Catholic issues, liturgy and life by Fr. John Zuhlsdorf    o{]:¬)