Fr. Lankeit Sermon: Our True Image and Inscription

Feast of the Most Sacred Heart

* Note: Picture from Fr. Buckley’s 50th Golden Jubilee. I was fortunate to have him as my Ignatian Retreat Master when the FSSP was in Elmhurst, PA

Rev. Father James Buckley, FSSP
On 1 July 2008, at the Shrine of the Most Blessed Sacrament in Hanceville, Alabama, Fr. James Buckley of the Priestly Fraternity of St. Peter, delivered the following homily for the First Solemn Mass of Father Jared McCambridge, FSSP.

The year was 1849. Forced to flee Rome by revolutionaries who had killed his prime minister, Blessed Pius IX, the Vicar of Christ and ruler of the papal states, was living in Gaeta, a territory which at that time belonged to the kingdom of Naples. Joining the exiled pope, Father Giovanni Merlini, the third superior general of the Fathers of the Precious Blood suggested to the Holy Father that in order to regain the papal states, he should bind himself by a vow to extend to the entire Catholic Church the Feast of the Precious Blood. On Saturday June 30, after consultation with prudent and pious priests, Pius IX without binding himself by vow informed Merlini that he would extend to the whole of Christendom the Feast of the Precious Blood. On that very day, the armies of France entered Rome and two days later revolutionaries capitulated. To commemorate this immediate and extraordinary sign of divine approval, Pius IX decreed the following August that the Feast of the Precious Blood would be celebrated throughout the world on the first Sunday of July, which in 1849 was July 1.
This history is an introduction to the feast itself which honors Christ for the special reason that He shed His blood for the remission of our sins. In his letter to the Ephesians, St. Paul in speaking of Christ says: “In whom we have redemption through his blood, the remission of sin, according to his grace” And St. Peter writes in his first epistle: “you have not been redeemed by perishable things silver and gold…but by the precious blood of Christ as of a lamb without spot”.

In his Eucharistic hymn “Adoro Te devote” St. Thomas Aquinas says: “Cujus una stilla salvum facere totum mundum quit ab omni scelere”. The meaning is this: one drop of Christ’s blood was sufficient to wash clean the whole world”. But it was not by one drop that He redeemed us. In the garden He sweat blood; when scourged, according to the Shroud of Turin, He received 120 lashes from the nape of His neck to His buttocks. Blood flowed from His sacred head crowned with thorns and when nailed to the cross blood poured from hands and feet while He lived and after His death it poured from His side.

It is the wound from His side which is the focus of today’s gospel. Saint John the Evangelist, an eye witness, reports that although Christ was already dead one of the soldiers opened his side with a lance. Saint Augustine observes that there is significance in the word opened because from the side of Christ as from a door there comes forth eternal life. This, he says, was foreshadowed by the door in the side of Noah’s ark. When it was opened all, both men and beasts, that were to be saved from the flood entered in.

Because the blood of a dead man congeals, it was a miracle, a divine sign, that blood flowed from the side of Christ after His death. This miracle was done, says St. Thomas, to show that through Christ’s passion we obtain full remission from sin. The eternal life that Christ brings us, moreover, is first communicated to us by baptism, represented by water. For Our Lord said: “Unless a man be born again of water and the Holy Spirit, he cannot enter into the kingdom of God”. The blood of Christ, the price of our salvation, also represents the Eucharist. As He Himself also said: “He who eats my flesh and drinks my blood hath everlasting life and I will raise him up on the last day”. Since baptism and the Eucharist belong to the Church, holy men from ancient times have recognized that Eve who was formed from the side of Adam sleeping in the garden foreshadowed the Church who was formed from the side of Christ, sleeping on the cross.

Because Christ humbled Himself becoming obedient unto death even to the death on the cross, God hath exalted him and given him a name that is above every name. In his human nature Christ subjected Himself to the will of the Father by undergoing bloody sufferings. He is now seated in glory at the Father’s right hand. The wounds He once suffered He now bears as sparkling trophies of His triumph over sin and death. These surpass the stars in splendor and the honeycomb in sweetness. All the diamonds and rubies of the Orient cannot compare with them in value nor can balsam and the rose equal their fragrance.

But although He is exalted in glory it is still most fitting for us to give him thanks and praise. In the colloquy for his meditation on the triple sin St. Ignatius bids those making the Spiritual Exercises to look at Christ hanging on the cross and consider that He who lives in eternity entered into time and that He who in His divine nature cannot suffer took to himself a human nature so that He could die on the cross for me and for my sins. Christ died for me. What have I ever done for Christ? What am I doing for Christ? What will I do for Christ?

In order that one love Christ in deed and not merely in word, he should try to make an improvement in his life. If, for example, he notices that he has some habit of venial sin, perhaps it is taking God’s name in vain, using bad language or talking about the faults of his neighbor; he should strive to improve first by resolving as soon as he awakes in the morning, to avoid the offense. Then at some time during the day he should examine his conscience, marking down on a piece of paper the number of times he has fallen. When he goes to confession, he should not only mention the offense but the number of times he has committed it. In a very short time, he will make extraordinary progress

The Blood of Christ, the Only Begotten Son of God, lavishly shed in the Passion is the price of our salvation. In our gratitude for the redemption He won for us at such a great price, we must engrave upon the walls of our mind those stirring words of Saint Ignatius: Christ died for me. What have I ever done for Christ? What am I doing for Christ? What will I do for Christ?

Provided Courtesy of:
Eternal Word Television Network
5817 Old Leeds Road
Irondale, AL 35210
www.ewtn.com

Teilhardian Claptrap from the “Preacher of the Papal Household”

by Christopher A. Ferrara

September 6, 2016

During Vespers on the “World Day of Prayer for the Care of Creation,” Father Raniero Cantalamessa, the aged Modernist who has been “Preacher of the Papal Household” for the past 36 years, uttered this gibberish during his so-called homily:

How long has the universe had to wait, what a long run-up it has had, to reach this point! It took billions of years during which opaque matter evolved toward the light of consciousness like the sap that slowly rises from under the ground to the top of the tree to flow into its leaves, flowers, and fruitThis consciousness was finally attained when “the human phenomenon,” as Teilhard de Chardin calls it, appeared in the universeBut now that the universe has reached this goalitexpects that human beings perform their duty and take on the task, so to speak, of directing the choir and to intone, in the name of all creation, “Glory to God in the highest!”

This, of course, is rank pantheism: the “universe” gave rise to human consciousness, not the personal Triune God by the special creation of Adam and Eve with their rational souls. So much for the Genesis account of creation and the infallible teaching of the Church on the descent of the whole human race from two first parents who fell from grace in Paradise. No, according to “the preacher of the papal household,” human consciousness just sort of bubbled up from “opaque matter” — a crude superstition worthy of pagan idolaters in the jungle.

And now, declares the “preacher of the papal household,” the universe
“expects” that man will lead the way in “caring for creation,” thus giving glory to “God.” Note the confusion between the universe and God, redolent of the heresy of Baruch Spinoza (1632-1677) which earned him excommunication even from the synagogues of the Netherlands. As Spinoza declared in his Ethics: “God, or Nature”, Deus, sive Natura: “That eternal and infinite being we call God, or Nature, acts from the same necessity from which he exists.”

“The preacher of the papal household” is spouting the evolutionary nonsense of the infamous Jesuit Teilhard de Chardin, whose theology is warmed-over Spinoza dressed up in pseudo-Catholic, semi-poetic musings disguised as a bold reconciliation of Scripture and the supposed “science” of neo-Darwinian evolution.

One need only recall the Holy Office Admonition of June 1962 regarding the writings of this theological and scientific fraud, who was implicated in the “discovery” of two fake fossils: Piltdown Man and Peking Man. As the Holy Office warned only weeks before the commencement of Vatican II:

Several works of Fr. Pierre Teilhard de Chardin… abound in such ambiguities and indeed even serious errors, as to offend Catholic doctrine.

For this reason, the most eminent and most revered Fathers of the Holy Office exhort all Ordinaries as well as the superiors of Religious institutes, rectors of seminaries and presidents of universities, effectively to protect the minds, particularly of the youth, against the dangers presented by the works of Fr. Teilhard de Chardin and of his followers.

After more than three years of the “Francis revolution,” however, it should come as no surprise that Francis, a liberal Jesuit formed in the Sixties, is also a devotee of de Chardin’s heretical babbling. In fact, it was Francis who rehabilitated de Chardin with a favorable reference in his “recyclical” Laudato si’, as I have shown here.

But such is the crisis in the Church today: yesterday’s condemned heretic is today’s “authority” in Catholic theology. This is what Lucia of Fatima meant by “diabolical disorientation.” Heresy is in, orthodoxy is out. The Vatican pursues worldly projects while ignoring man’s eternal destiny. We are exhorted to “care for creation,” but no one in Rome is exhorting us to care for the immortal soul, which even the pagan philosopher Plato knew is man’s most precious possession.

The Church is upside down and only God, through the intercession of His Blessed Mother, can set it right again — as the world will see in the light of Fatima.

Source: Fatima Perspectives – Perspective No.887

BREAKING: Three Suicide Bombs, Gunfire Rock Istanbul’s Ataturk Airport; 28 Killed, Multiple Injuries | Mediaite

by Sam Reisman | 3:28 pm, June 28th, 2016

Three explosions rocked the departures area of the international terminal of Istanbul’s Ataturk airport Tuesday night, resulting in at least 28 deaths and some 60 injuries.

Turkish police reportedly exchanged gunfire with three attackers armed with Kalashnikovs in an effort to neutralize them. During the gunfight, the attackers blew themselves up, according to a Turkish official.

Source: BREAKING: Three Suicide Bombs, Gunfire Rock Istanbul’s Ataturk Airport; 28 Killed, Multiple Injuries | Mediaite

Archbishop Lori: ‘All of Us Must Stand Before the World as Witnesses to Freedom’ | Daily News | NCRegister.com

Archbishop Lori: ‘All of Us Must Stand Before the World as Witnesses to Freedom’

In homily for June 21 opening Mass for the ‘Fortnight to Freedom,’ Baltimore archbishop cites example of Sts. Thomas More and John Fisher, as well as the Little Sisters of the Poor.

BY ARCHBISHOP WILLIAM LORI 06/22/2016

Archbishop William Lori venerates the relics of St. Thomas More and John Fisher at the basilica in Baltimore on June 21.– USCCB Freedom TwitterArchbishop William Lori of Baltimore gave the following homily for the June 21 opening Mass for the “Fortnight for Freedom” at the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary in Baltimore (edited for Register style):

I. Introduction: The Faithful Witness

Tonight we celebrate the opening Mass of the 2016 “Fortnight for Freedom,” returning to this, the first cathedral in the United States, a cathedral that was under construction even as “a new nation conceived in liberty” began to take shape. But we are not here tonight to argue a point of constitutional law, nor are we here to re-argue what has already been persuasively argued in our courts. No, we are here to honor the martyrs, to celebrate the freedom to bear witness, beginning with Jesus Christ, “the faithful witness” of the Father’s love (Revelation 1:5), for Christ and his sacrificial love are the very heart of the Eucharist we celebrate.

Source: Archbishop Lori: ‘All of Us Must Stand Before the World as Witnesses to Freedom’ | Daily News | NCRegister.com

RORATE CÆLI: Socci: “Pope Bergoglio: ‘Jesus plays the fool a bit’ — and other grave expressions and actions”

Socci: “Pope Bergoglio: ‘Jesus plays the fool a bit’ — and other grave expressions and actions”

Pope Bergoglio: “Jesus plays the fool a bit”. This and other inconceivable, extremely grave “expressions” pronounced last Thursday…

Antonio Socci
LO STRANIERO
19th June 2016

It is earth-shattering for a pope to mix-up a two-faced devil with Jesus. It happened last Thursday when Bergoglio mistakenly referred to a column capital on Vézelay Cathedral: a “case of mistaken identity” emblematic of this pontificate, even if a somewhat superficial ghost-writer was probably to blame.

It is, on the other hand, in his own style to mix them up (Jesus and the devil) by proposing that Judas had been saved (without repenting) thus giving the impression he hadn’t ended up in hell…

It’s difficult to know whether this Pope believes in hell or not – but listening to him – it seems that the only ones going there are those who are against mass immigration, who use air-conditioners or plastic glasses and Christians who follow the Gospel to the letter.

via RORATE CÆLI: Socci: “Pope Bergoglio: ‘Jesus plays the fool a bit’ — and other grave expressions and actions”

RORATE CÆLI: Ignorance of Christ

In Advent, time of expectation, it is interesting to read an almost unknown homily of Pope Paul VI, found only in Italian on the Vatican website. It was preached at a Roman parish on Passion Sunday, April 4, 1965. Excerpts follow:

Read more . . .

Feast of the Most Sacred Heart

On 1 July 2008, at the Shrine of the Most Blessed Sacrament in Hanceville, Alabama, Fr. James Buckley of the Priestly Fraternity of St. Peter, delivered the following homily for the First Solemn Mass of Father Jared McCambridge, FSSP.The year was 1849. Forced to flee Rome by revolutionaries who had killed his prime minister, Blessed Pius IX, the Vicar of Christ and ruler of the papal states, was living in Gaeta, a territory which at that time belonged to the kingdom of Naples. Joining the exiled pope, Father Giovanni Merlini, the third superior general of the Fathers of the Precious Blood suggested to the Holy Father that in order to regain the papal states, he should bind himself by a vow to extend to the entire Catholic Church the Feast of the Precious Blood. On Saturday June 30, after consultation with prudent and pious priests, Pius IX without binding himself by vow informed Merlini that he would extend to the whole of Christendom the Feast of the Precious Blood. On that very day, the armies of France entered Rome and two days later revolutionaries capitulated. To commemorate this immediate and extraordinary sign of divine approval, Pius IX decreed the following August that the Feast of the Precious Blood would be celebrated throughout the world on the first Sunday of July, which in 1849 was July 1.This history is an introduction to the feast itself which honors Christ for the special reason that He shed His blood for the remission of our sins. In his letter to the Ephesians, St. Paul in speaking of Christ says: “In whom we have redemption through his blood, the remission of sin, according to his grace” And St. Peter writes in his first epistle: “you have not been redeemed by perishable things silver and gold…but by the precious blood of Christ as of a lamb without spot”.

In his Eucharistic hymn “Adoro Te devote” St. Thomas Aquinas says: “Cujus una stilla salvum facere totum mundum quit ab omni scelere”. The meaning is this: one drop of Christ’s blood was sufficient to wash clean the whole world”. But it was not by one drop that He redeemed us. In the garden He sweat blood; when scourged, according to the Shroud of Turin, He received 120 lashes from the nape of His neck to His buttocks. Blood flowed from His sacred head crowned with thorns and when nailed to the cross blood poured from hands and feet while He lived and after His death it poured from His side.

It is the wound from His side which is the focus of today’s gospel. Saint John the Evangelist, an eye witness, reports that although Christ was already dead one of the soldiers opened his side with a lance. Saint Augustine observes that there is significance in the word opened because from the side of Christ as from a door there comes forth eternal life. This, he says, was foreshadowed by the door in the side of Noah’s ark. When it was opened all, both men and beasts, that were to be saved from the flood entered in.

Because the blood of a dead man congeals, it was a miracle, a divine sign, that blood flowed from the side of Christ after His death. This miracle was done, says St. Thomas, to show that through Christ’s passion we obtain full remission from sin. The eternal life that Christ brings us, moreover, is first communicated to us by baptism, represented by water. For Our Lord said: “Unless a man be born again of water and the Holy Spirit, he cannot enter into the kingdom of God”. The blood of Christ, the price of our salvation, also represents the Eucharist. As He Himself also said: “He who eats my flesh and drinks my blood hath everlasting life and I will raise him up on the last day”. Since baptism and the Eucharist belong to the Church, holy men from ancient times have recognized that Eve who was formed from the side of Adam sleeping in the garden foreshadowed the Church who was formed from the side of Christ, sleeping on the cross.

Because Christ humbled Himself becoming obedient unto death even to the death on the cross, God hath exalted him and given him a name that is above every name. In his human nature Christ subjected Himself to the will of the Father by undergoing bloody sufferings. He is now seated in glory at the Father’s right hand. The wounds He once suffered He now bears as sparkling trophies of His triumph over sin and death. These surpass the stars in splendor and the honeycomb in sweetness. All the diamonds and rubies of the Orient cannot compare with them in value nor can balsam and the rose equal their fragrance.

But although He is exalted in glory it is still most fitting for us to give him thanks and praise. In the colloquy for his meditation on the triple sin St. Ignatius bids those making the Spiritual Exercises to look at Christ hanging on the cross and consider that He who lives in eternity entered into time and that He who in His divine nature cannot suffer took to himself a human nature so that He could die on the cross for me and for my sins. Christ died for me. What have I ever done for Christ? What am I doing for Christ? What will I do for Christ?

In order that one love Christ in deed and not merely in word, he should try to make an improvement in his life. If, for example, he notices that he has some habit of venial sin, perhaps it is taking God’s name in vain, using bad language or talking about the faults of his neighbor; he should strive to improve first by resolving as soon as he awakes in the morning, to avoid the offense. Then at some time during the day he should examine his conscience, marking down on a piece of paper the number of times he has fallen. When he goes to confession, he should not only mention the offense but the number of times he has committed it. In a very short time, he will make extraordinary progress

The Blood of Christ, the Only Begotten Son of God, lavishly shed in the Passion is the price of our salvation. In our gratitude for the redemption He won for us at such a great price, we must engrave upon the walls of our mind those stirring words of Saint Ignatius: Christ died for me. What have I ever done for Christ? What am I doing for Christ? What will I do for Christ?


Provided Courtesy of:
Eternal Word Television Network
5817 Old Leeds Road
Irondale, AL 35210
www.ewtn.com