Blog: The Catholic Church’s Push for a Multicultural Utopia Gets Weird

By Susan D. Harris

Motivated by the Gospel of Jesus Christ, who they claim was himself a migrant and a refugee; the Catholic Church is set to kick off their “Share the Journey” campaign on September 27, 2017.  With left-leaning Pope Francis at the helm, the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB) intends to instruct all Catholics to get with the program and accept all kinds of immigrants in the U.S. — or face eternal damnation.  Worse yet, I’m going to outline how the Catholic Church is putting young people through questionable psychological exercises in an odd game of “be the refugee.”Hot off the presses and hitting a church near you comes the pamphlet, “Our Faith Teaches: Welcoming the Refugee and the Migrant.”  The pamphlet begins the church’s two-year mass education effort to condition (especially United States) Catholics to support programs like “Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals” (DACA) and apparently accept “global migration” by any immigrant group — no questions asked.The “Share the Journey” website first introduces us to immigrant “Ruth” — a name obviously meant to invoke the Biblical Ruth who was widowed and then followed her mother-in-law into a strange land — and famously gave the world, “Whither thou goest, I will go.”  Today’s Ruth, however, sadly “lived in the shadows” until President Obama introduced DACA. We are told that, “Over 780,000 youth have received protection from the DACA program since its inception by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) in 2012.”  The USCCB official statement is pretty clear on the subject and reads in part:The cancellation of the DACA program is reprehensible.  It causes unnecessary fear for DACA youth and their families.  These youth entered the U.S. as minors and often know America as their only home…This decision is unacceptable and does not reflect who we are as Americans…As people of faith, we say to DACA youth — regardless of your immigration status (emphasis mine), you are children of God and welcome in the Catholic Church.  The Catholic Church supports you and will advocate for you.So they aren’t just welcoming illegals into the church spiritually and offering hot meals, they’re also saying “come to us and we’ll help you fight the government.”It’s much bigger than DACA, though.  Over the next two years, the Catholic Church will attempt to convince every adherent to its faith that its long history of social justice is culminating in forcing every country, (but especially the United States) into accepting any and all illegal immigrants in the name of Jesus Christ.  One of the two greatest commandments was, after all, “Love your neighbor as yourself,” (the name of the church’s first upcoming campaign for immigrants and refugees;) and if one fails to comply, that would obviously be a sin; and Jesus — the scorned migrant — was crucified for the forgiveness of our sins.  If you think this is too over-the-top, consider that the “Social Justice” part of the church’s catechism is being invoked with a heavy-handedness not seen since its inception.  From Article 3, Social Justice, we find the phrases:“Distribution of wealth…”“Social justice is linked to the common good…”“Society ensures social justice by providing the conditions that allow associations and individuals to obtain their due.”“The duty of making oneself a neighbor to others and actively serving them becomes even more urgent when it involves the disadvantaged, in whatever area this may be…This same duty extends to those who think or act differently from us.”“These differences belong to God’s plan, who wills that each receive what he needs from others…These differences encourage and often oblige persons to practice…sharing of goods; they foster the mutual enrichment of cultures.”“The equal dignity of human persons requires the effort to reduce excessive social and economic inequalities”(In an interesting aside, this article comparing Socialism to Catholicism, then subsequently rejecting the idea, reads like it was written in 2017 rather than 1913.)This scrutiny of the Catechism of the Catholic Church is done now owing to the church’s current in-your-face activism and their upcoming agenda which begins with the “week of prayer and action for migrants and refugees.”  Set to run from October 7-13, the main webpage prominently features a Muslim woman; and since all of the pictures beneath her appear to be of Muslims, one assumes they are the only type of “immigrant and refugee” that the church is concerned with.The toolkit offered for “prayer and action” has instructions for implementation at Mass, in Catholic schools, on . . .

Read more here: Blog: The Catholic Church’s Push for a Multicultural Utopia Gets Weird

RORATE CÆLI: Prophetic Speech of Pope Ven. Pius XII Warns of “a Church which Weakens the Law of God”

Source: RORATE CÆLI: Prophetic Speech of Pope Ven. Pius XII Warns of “a Church which Weakens the Law of God”

 

In this time of new persecutions against Christians by Islamicists, secularists, and sexual anarchists, and of a pope who so openly emboldens and gives comfort to these and other enemies of Holy Mother Church, while shirking his duty to confirm his brethren in the faith, we publish in English translation (below) the prophetic words of the Venerable Pope Pius XII, given on February 20, 1949 to the people of Rome, condemning the persecution of Christians in Eastern Europe by the socialist and communist dictatorships.

Pius XII warns of “a Church which weakens the law of God, adapting it to the taste of human desires, when she should loudly proclaim and defend it” and which would give herself over to “the shifting sands of the opinions of the day.”  He asks: “Would you recognize in such a Church the features of your Mother’s face? Can you imagine a Successor of the first Peter, who would bow to similar demands?” Can anyone now deny that we live in just such a time as this?

 

ADDRESS OF HIS HOLINESS PIUS XII TO THE FAITHFUL

Sunday, February 20, 1949
Romans! Beloved sons and daughters!
Once again, in a grave and dolorous hour, the faithful people of the Eternal City has rushed to its Bishop and Father.
Once again, this superb colonnade seems barely able to embrace with its gigantic arms the crowds, which like waves driven by an irresistible force, have flowed to the threshold of the Vatican Basilica, in order to attend the Mass of Atonement in the central point of the whole Catholic world and to pour out the sentiments with which their souls are overflowing.
Among the unanimous condemnations of the civilized world, the sentence imposed upon an eminent Cardinal of the Holy Roman Church on the banks of the Danube has raised on the banks of the Tiber a cry of indignation worthy of the City.
But the fact that a regime opposed to religion has this time attacked a Prince of the Church, revered by the vast majority of his people, is not an isolated case; it is one of the links in the long chain of persecutions which some dictatorial States have waged against Christian doctrine and life.
A well-known characteristic common to persecutors of all times is that, not content with physically crushing their victims, they want also to make them appear despicable and hateful to their country and to society.
Who does not remember the Roman martyrs, of whom Tacitus speaks (Annals 15:44), immolated under Nero and made to appear as arsonists, abominable criminals, enemies of mankind?
Modern persecutors show themselves to be the docile disciples of that inglorious school. They copy, so to speak, their masters and models, if, indeed, they do not surpass them in cruelty, clever as they are in the art of employing the most recent progress in the technical sciences for the purpose of a domination and enslavement of the people which in the past would not have been conceivable.
Romans! The Church of Christ is following the road traced out for her by the divine Redeemer. She feels herself eternal; she knows that she cannot perish, that the most violent storms will not succeed in submerging her. She begs no favours; the threats and disfavor of earthly authorities do not intimidate her. She does not interfere in problems purely economic or political, nor does she occupy herself with debates on the usefulness or banefulness of one form of government or another. Always eager, in so far as she is able, to be at peace with all (cf. Rom 12:8), she renders unto Caesar that which is Caesar’s, but she cannot betray or abandon that which belongs to God.
Now, it is well known what the totalitarian and anti-religious State requires and expects from her [the Church] as the price for her tolerance and her problematic recognition. That is, it would desire:
a Church which remains silent, when she should speak out;
a Church which weakens the law of God, adapting it to the taste of human desires, when she should loudly proclaim and defend it;
a Church which detaches herself from the unwavering foundation upon which Christ built her, in order to repose comfortably on the shifting sands of the opinions of the day or to give herself up to the passing current;
a Church which does not withstand the oppression of conscience and does not protect the legitimate rights and the just liberties of the people;
a Church which, with indecorous servility, remains enclosed within the four walls of the temple, which forgets the divine mandate received from Christ: Go forth to the street corners (Matt 22:9), teach all peoples (Matt 28:19).
Beloved sons and daughters! Spiritual heirs of an innumerable legion of confessors and martyrs!
Is this the Church whom you venerate and love? Would you recognize in such a Church the features of your Mother’s face? Can you imagine a Successor of the first Peter, who would bow to similar demands?
The Pope has the divine promises; even in his human weaknesses, he is invincible and unshakable; he is the messenger of truth and justice, the principle of the unity of the Church; his voice denounces errors, idolatries, superstitions; he condemns iniquities; he makes charity and virtue loved.
Can he [the Pope] then remain silent when in a nation the churches which are united to the center of Christendom, to Rome, are snatched away through violence or cunning; when all the Greek-Catholic bishops are imprisoned because they refuse to apostatize from their faith; when priests and the faithful are persecuted and arrested because they refuse to leave their true Mother Church?
Can the Pope remain silent, when the right to educate their own children is taken away from parents by a minority regime which wants to alienate them from Christ?
Can the Pope remain silent when a State, surpassing the limits of its authority, arrogates to itself the power to abolish dioceses, to depose Bishops, to overturn the ecclesiastical organization, and to reduce it below the minimum requirements for the effectual care of souls?
Can the Pope remain silent when the point is reached of punishing a priest with imprisonment, guilty of refusing to violate the most sacred and inviolable of secrets, the secret of sacramental confession?
Is all this perhaps illegitimate interference in the political powers of the State? Who could honestly affirm anything of the kind? Your exclamations have already given the answer to these and many other similar questions.
May the Lord God reward your fidelity, beloved sons and daughters. May He give you strength in the present and future struggles. May He make you vigilant against the attacks of His and your enemies. May He illumine with His light the minds of those whose eyes are still closed to the truth. May he grant to those hearts, which today are far from him, the grace to sincerely return to that faith and to those fraternal sentiments whose denial threatens the peace of humanity.
And now may Our lavish, paternal, and affectionate Apostolic Blessing descend upon you, the City and the World.

RORATE CÆLI: Fr. Rutler: In this presidential election, we cannot be indifferent – one side is flawed, but the other is EVIL

 

October 30, 2016

by Fr. George W. Rutler

On the Election
Exactly eight years ago I wrote a column titled “The One We Were Waiting For” in which I referred to a book by Monsignor Robert Hugh Benson, The Lord of the World. That dystopian novel has been cited by Pope Benedict XVI, and Pope Francis said he has read it several times. The protagonist, if one can apply that term to an Anti-Christ, imposed a new world religion with Man himself as god. His one foe was Christianity, which he thwarted in part by using “compromised Catholics and compliant priests to persuade timid Catholics.
Since then, that program has been realized in our time, to an extent beyond the warnings of the most dire pessimists. Our federal government has intimidated religious orders and churches, challenging religious freedom. The institution of the family has been re-defined, and sexual identity has been Gnosticized to the point of mocking biology. Assisted suicide is spreading, abortions since 1973 have reached a total equal to the population of Italy, and sexually transmitted diseases are at a record high. Objective journalism has died, justice has been corrupted, racial bitterness ruins cities, entertainment is degraded, knowledge of the liberal arts spirals downwards, and authentically Catholic universities have all but vanished. A weak and confused foreign policy has encouraged aggressor nations and terrorism, while metastasized immigration is destroying remnant western cultures, and genocide is slaughtering Christian populations. The cynical promise of economic prosperity is mocked by the lowest rate of labor participation in forty years, an unprecedented number of people on food stamps and welfare assistance, and the largest disparity in wealth in over a century.
In his own grim days, Saint Augustine warned against nostalgia: “The past times that you think were good, are good because they are not yours here and now.” The present time, however, might try even his confidence. Sands blow over the ruins of churches he knew in North Africa where the Cross is virtually forbidden. By a blessed irony, a new church is opened every day in formerly Communist Russia, while churches in our own formerly Christian nation are being closed daily. For those who bought into the seductions of politicians’ false hopes, there is the counsel of Walt Kelly’s character Pogo: “It’s always darkest before it goes pitch black.”
It is incorrect to say that the coming election poses a choice between two evils. For ethical and aesthetic reasons, there may be some bad in certain candidates, but badness consists in doing bad things. Evil is different: it is the deliberate destruction of truth, virtue and holiness.
While one may pragmatically vote for a flawed candidate, one may not vote for anyone who advocates and enables unmitigatedly evil acts, and that includes abortion. “In the case of an intrinsically unjust law, such as a law permitting abortion or euthanasia, it is therefore never licit to obey it, or to ‘take part in a propaganda campaign in favor of such a law, or vote for it’” (Evangelium Vitae, 73).
At one party’s convention, the name of God was excluded from its platform and a woman who boasted of having aborted her child was applauded. It is a grave sin, requiring sacramental confession and penance, to become an accomplice in objective evil by voting for anyone who encourages it, for that imperils the nation and destroys the soul.
It is also the duty of the clergy to make this clear and not to shrink, under the pretense of charity, from explaining the Church’s censures. Wolves in sheep’s clothing are dangerous, but worse are wolves in shepherd’s clothing. While the evils foreseen eight years ago were realized, worse would come if those affronts to human dignity were endorsed again. In the most adverse prospect, God forbid, there might not be another free election, and soon Catholics would arrive at shuttered churches and vacant altars. The illusion of indifference cannot long be perpetuated by lame jokes and synthetic laughter at banquets, for there is handwriting on the wall.