Communion Statement Stirs Controversy

This is from an article published 6 years ago and shows that the USCCB has not changed much. They have problems speaking out clearly on moral issues though the statement at the end of the article by Bishop Fabian Bruskewitz is interesting in as much as it makes clear that the USCCB has no binding power on Catholics. The power actually resides in each of the local Bishops and they are the one’s that should be setting the rules in their own diocese. Unfortunately, few take these issues on directly and seemingly hide behind these non-binding statements from the USCCB.

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St. Louis Archbishop Raymond Burke said Catholics who write or vote for pro-abortion laws are rampant and cause widespread scandal and confusion by defying canon law and receiving Communion.

“Why is it that whenever one of these politicians is notorious for voting against the natural moral law ultimately he gets his picture in Time magazine receiving holy Communion?” Archbishop Burke asked. “It’s an open affront to the Church and her most sacred teaching. It’s profoundly confusing to the faithful, and we should clear it up.”

Read more . . . Communion Statement Stirs Controversy | News | NCRegister.com.

10 thoughts on “Communion Statement Stirs Controversy

  1. Biltrix

    That last phrase, “We should clear it up,” is very telling. I hope it is an indication that they are beginning to see the need to start calling people out directly for their wholesale disregard for Church teaching and the scandal it causes. I hope.

    Reply
    • Servus Fidelis Post author

      I would as well but note that these statements were made 6 years ago and I see no movement for the bishops to act alone or in concert to rectify the situation.

      Reply
      • Mr. V.

        I wonder if enough Catholics in every diocese petition their bishops for action, would it prompt the bishops and the priests under them to deny Communion to those public Catholics acting in that manner?

        Reply
        • Servus Fidelis Post author

          If you’ve seen the polls of how the Catholic in the pew thinks, we would risk having many others positing the opposite opinion. I don’t think that Bishops are very amenable to petitions anyway – nor should they. They are supposed to be the shepherds. It’s up to them to tell the sheep – not the other way around.

          Reply
      • Biltrix

        Well, there has been some speaking out lately. No individual excommunication made public, but I can think of at least 4 bishops who have stated that Catholics who publicly dissent from Church teaching on certain issues should not receive communion in their diocese. That is a first step (among others that need to be taken). I don’t think that warning will have a massive ripple effect until one of the bishops, or more takes it to the next level. I anticipate that it is coming to that. Again, I hope.

        Reply
  2. Servus Fidelis Post author

    I would as well but note that these statements were made 6 years ago and I see no movement for the bishops to act alone or in concert to rectify the situation.

    Reply
    • Servus Fidelis Post author

      If you’ve seen the polls of how the Catholic in the pew thinks, we would risk having many others positing the opposite opinion. I don’t think that Bishops are very amenable to petitions anyway – nor should they. They are supposed to be the shepherds. It’s up to them to tell the sheep – not the other way around.

      Reply
  3. Mr. V.

    “They are supposed to be the shepherds. It’s up to them to tell the sheep – not the other way around.”

    Oh, I know….it just gets frustrating when the shepherds aren’t doing what needs to be done.

    Reply
    • Servus Fidelis Post author

      Indeed not. I’m tired of having hirelings that leave us to the wolves or simply leave it to our own best judgments.

      Reply

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